Transcription
  • Would you normally be doing this for them as an FA? Not anymore. Yes.
  • You must become a "last resort" choice.. But I've always done this.. But they need help. .
  • Do you want to help just one time? You can be their mentor and offer a solution that will help them long after you are done working with the family. Plus, COVID doesn't allow for you to do this anyway... except as a last resort. Don't even tell the family you are a last resort until all other options have been looked at.. I want to be a lifelong helper, a mentor, someone who made a difference....
  • Now start the flow chart over and pick "Not anymore!"..
  • Do you want to help just one time? You can be their mentor and offer a solution that will help them long after you are done working with the family. Plus, COVID doesn't allow for you to do this anyway... except as a last resort. Don't even tell the family you are a last resort until all other options have been looked at.. I want to be a lifelong helper, a mentor, someone who made a difference....
  • Now start the flow chart over and pick "Not anymore!"..
  • Have a lasting impact by helping to solve these problems "long term". Have you ever talked to the family about a support network? Not yet, but I'll try.. No. As the FA I give all the needed rides, account for their financial needs through my allowed BTHS monthly funds, and even watch their other children when I give them rides to appointments..
  • Support networks are an essential part of any family... ask yourself one question. Does your child's preschool teacher still give you rides if you need them? If I come across a problem I cannot solve alone, I rely on my support network of friends, family, and other resources I've developed over the years.. Well, no....
  • Right, because that would be absurd! You cannot still be the person these families call when their 4 year old is 14 years old.... and when they get to kindergarten, the teachers will not be giving them rides. This only sets them up for failure in the long run. Go back to "have you talked to your family about a support network" and click that you'll try, so you can see what to do next..
  • Exactly! This is the kind of long lasting help you can guide your families through. Go back to "have you talked to your family about a support network" and click that you'll try, so you can see what to do next..
  • Ask your family if they know what a support network is. Ask them if they have people (besides you) that they can rely on for help.. The family says they have no supports. They literally have absolutely no one in their lives that can help them with anything other than me... in fact they don't even get along with their own sister. . The family says that they do have supports. .
  • Perfect! Help them make categories like; "People who can help on short notice" , "People who need time to plan before helping", "People who can help with child care but not rides" and so on....
  • Use guided questions. If they have literally no one to help... who takes them for groceries (and if it is you, stop doing that...). Who gives them a ride to work? Who do they call if they need to go to the ER? Have they called EMTA, the assistance office, BeST Transit? Do they have a caseworker and have they tried using CYS for help (which is the purpose). Even if they can't stand their sister, does she love the kids enough to help? Do they have coworkers, neighbors, friends, other family... he.

Related Topics

Related Trees

More from this iBosker