Decision Support System Diet Management

Last updated 4 years ago First published 14 April, 2017

People tend to eat a lot of processed food due to their busy schedule. They don’t follow a diet and eat lot of junk/unhealthy food. Though some people eat right they don’t exercise enough to keep them away from certain diseases.
With the modern lifestyle stuffed with all the luxuries and catered with abundance of unhealthy foods obesity have been noted globally. Thus, most people have pay more attention and give interest in health by regular exercise and management of good nutrition each meal. Dietary management has become crucial to monitor personal health status, and its increasing demand drives the development of an accurate and convenient tool for dietary management1.
As the quality and quantity of foods and drinks consumed has a significant impact on the health and well being of individuals, society and the environment, better nutrition has a huge potential to improve individual and public health outcomes and decrease healthcare costs. Optimum nutrition is essential for the normal growth and physical and cognitive development of infants and children. Dietary recommendations can be effective in directing people to the types of food they should consume. Overconsumption, even of nutritious foods, can lead to excessive energy intake compared with energy needs and thereby an increase in body weight 2.
Diet quality indices assist in translating intake data collected using dietary assessment methods to values or scores that are more easily interpretable and allow for consistent comparisons between groups of interest. Such indices are developed to measure dietary patterns, behaviours and adherence to particular eating recommendations in populations3. Food-related decisions made by individuals are influenced by a complex array of factors and processes. These include demographic factors, familial and household influences, habit and price, health considerations, ethical concerns and wider societal trends4.
Additionally, research suggests that obesity may persist into adulthood and increase the risk of chronic diseases including heart disease, increased blood pressure, and type 2 diabetes, thus making it a major public health concern 5,6. Because of the known association between dietary intake and obesity 7,8, promoting healthy eating behaviors in youth could help decrease the elevated prevalence of obesity. Nutrition is getting food into the body for growth and energy, and for keeping the body healthy and living (Nordqvist, 2009).
Nowadays, the majority of people are overweight and obese because modern lifestyle stuffed with all the luxuries and catered with abundance of unhealthy junk foods is responsible for all these health problems. It is not just only health that is suffering. It also related to medical cost. So, all most people should pay more attention and be interested in health by regular exercise and management of good nutrition each meal.
In order to solve the problems cited in this paper, thus this study design a Decision Support System for diet planning that is capable of analyzing the basic information of individual and provide decisions for food to intake and body exercises

Health,Diet Planning,Food Chart,Recommend Exercise English Rating: Above 18 Shortest path: 9 nodes Longest path: 9 nodes Possible solutions: 54
Marylene Eder I am student in Asian Institute of Technology. I have taken a subject Decision Support Technologies. I want to create decision tree for my project
Transcription
  • Are you a Vegetarian Or NonVegetarian. Non Vegetarian. Vegetarian.
  • Do you have any Health Concern. HEart. Diabetic. None.
  • What is your BMI Range? Underweight. Healthy Weight. Overweight.
  • Body Fat Range. Essential. Acceptable. Fitness.
  • Food Chart 1.
  • Food Chart 2.
  • Food Chart 3.
  • Body Fat Range. Fitness. Essential. Acceptable.
  • Food Chart 4.
  • Food Chart 5.
  • Food Chart 6.
  • Bofy Fat. Fitness. Essential. Acceptable.
  • Food Chart 7.
  • Food Chart 8.
  • Food Chart 9.
  • What is your BMI Range. Underweight. Healthy Weight. Overweight.
  • Body Fat. Fitness. Essenti. Acceptable.
  • Food Chart 10.
  • Food Chart 11.
  • Food Chart 12.
  • Body Fat. Fitness. Essential. Acceptable.
  • Food Chart 13.
  • Food Chart 14.
  • Food Chart 15.
  • Body Fat. Acceptable. Fitness. Essential.
  • Food Chart 16.
  • Food Chart 17.
  • Food Chart 18.
  • What is your BMI Range. Underweight. Healthy. Overweight.
  • Body Fat. Fitness. Essential. Acceptable.
  • Food Chart 19.
  • Food Chart 20.
  • Food Chart 21.
  • Body Fat. Acceptable. Fitness. Essential.
  • Food Chart 22.
  • Food Chart 23.
  • Food Chart 24.
  • Body Fat. Acceptable. Fitness. Essential.
  • Food Chart 25.
  • Food Chart 26.
  • Food Chart 27.
  • Do you Have any ealth Concern. None. Heart. Diabetic.
  • What is your BMI Range. Underweight. Healthy Weight. Overweight.
  • Body Fat. Fitness. Essential. Acceptable.
  • Food Chart 28.
  • Food Chart 29.
  • Food Chart 30.
  • Body Fat. Acceptable. Fitness. Essential.
  • Food Chart 31.
  • Food Chart 32.
  • Food Chart 33.
  • Body Fat. Acceptable. Fitness. Essential.
  • Food Chart 34.
  • Food Chart 35.
  • Food Chart 36.
  • What is your BMI Range. Overweight. Underweight. Healthy Weight.
  • Body Fat. Acceptable. Fitness. Essential.
  • Food Chart 37.
  • Food Chart 38.
  • Fodd Chart 39.
  • Body Fat. Acceptable. Fitness. Essential.
  • Food Chart 40.
  • Food Chart 41.
  • Food Chart 42.
  • Body Fat. Acceptable. Fitness. Essential.
  • Food Chart 43.
  • Food Chart 44.
  • Food Chart 45.
  • What is your BMI Range. Healthy Wieght. Overweight. Underweight.
  • Body Fat. Acceptance. Fitness. Essential.
  • Food Chart 46.
  • Food Chart 47.
  • Food Chart 48.
  • Body Fat. Acceptable. Fitness. Essential.
  • Food Chart 49.
  • Food Chart 50.
  • Food Chart 51.
  • Body Fat. Acceptable. Fitness. Essential.
  • Food Chart 52.
  • Food Chart 53.
  • Food Chart 54.